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This image was posted to the official Patriot’s Facebook page.  What do you think earned media or native ad?

5 predictions about Influence Marketing

iworkinpr:

When someone asks why you got into PR

"Because I’m a people person."

iworkinpr:

When someone asks why you got into PR

"Because I’m a people person."

iworkinpr:

The joy I feel when another male PR professional joins the agency

iworkinpr:

The joy I feel when another male PR professional joins the agency

I StumbledUpon this post: How to Plant Ideas in Someone’s Mind from Lifehacker which came with this caveat:

Before we get started, it’s worth noting that planting an idea in someone’s mind without them knowing is a form of manipulation. We’re not here to judge you, but this is the sort of thing most people consider evil, so you probably shouldn’t actually do anything you read here. Instead, use this information to stay sharp.

Seriously? That’s the whole point of the article.  Think about that for a second, because it’s the perfect segue;to the author’s first point.

1. Reverse psychology. The author draws the distinction between passive-aggressive, what most people mistake for reverse psychology and what it actually is. Try arguing with a roommate over doing dishes with a lousy alternative, not a guilt trip:

present the crappy alternative to not doing the dishes without placing any blame. Rather than being preoccupied with an accusation, your roommate is left to only consider the alternative. This is how reverse psychology can be effective, so long as you say it like you mean it.

2.  Talk around the idea.  In this technique, we let someone else draw conclusions.  Effective PR people do this with story pitches.  A common refrain is to “pitch a story, not a product.”  Sage advice, but there’s a better one too:  Pitch bits and pieces a writer can connect.  They are more inclined to write if they come to the conclusion on their own, rather than suggesting one for them. 

You have to look at planting ideas in the same way you’d look at solving a mystery. Slowly but surely you offer the target a series of clues until the obvious conclusion is the one you want.

3. Undersell.  I’m not too keen on this one.  It strikes me as a hoodwink. There’s an ethical difference in my mind between persuasion and manipulation.  The author is suggesting planting the seed of doubt in a purchase in an effort to get someone to buy more. Selling a car?  Yeah, the cheap one should meet your needs, so long as you don’t need to drive long trips too often.  The buyer starts to think they need to spend more money; upsell coming. 

The point is, if you appear to have their best interests at heart it can be easy to make them think they want to buy more from you.

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7 essential principles to succeed in PR

bigguyd:

image

It’s that time of year that I give you my no BS social media trends post. Enjoy it.

- Kids will continue to hate Facebook because mom and dad (and grandma) are using it.

- Adults will try to figure out snapchat but we will be confused.

- Texting will reign as the cross demographic…